Arabesque

dance academy

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur at vero adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod.

Welcome to Holy City Dance Center! Feel free to email us at info@holycitydance.com

Discover the Joy of Movement at Holy City Dance Center

Large Multi-Room Dance Studio

  • Dance Classes
  • Dance Lessons
  • Top Dancing Tips for Beginners
  • Dance with Your Heart

Groove to the Music with Dance Classes Near Folly Beach, SC

Dancing has a wonderful way of taking us to a special place where we can embrace the moment and forget our worries, if only for a few minutes. It's enjoyable, healthy, and a great way to connect with others who share your passions. It can also be magical, like when you hear your favorite song and nail a high-energy dance routine that you've been practicing. But for new and seasoned dancers looking for classes in The Palmetto State, what options are there to consider?

If you're reading this and looking for a dance studio in South Carolina, look no further than Holy City Dance Center. From first-time beginners to experienced dancers with hours of on-stage experience, Holy City Dance has the leadership, facility, and classes to keep you moving to the music all year long.

Service Areas

Dance School Folly Beach, SC

You'll Be Happy to Call Holy City Dance Center Home

When you choose Holy City Dance, you get much more than a place to practice new dance moves - you get access to an elite dancing experience in a warm, welcoming environment full of feel-good juju purpose-driven instruction. We believe that dance lessons and dancing in general help produce happy people. As such, we do everything in our power to provide a happy, positive studio in which dancers, new and old, can learn and express themselves.

Every member of our leadership team and staff is professional, talented, and, perhaps most importantly, fully committed to safely and lovingly guiding dancers. While we specialize in teaching dance lessons, we also focus on building character and kindness - especially for our younger students. At the end of the day, our goal is to combine the best aspects of hard work and dance to create a fulfilling and fun experience for all.

With a long list of both youth and adult dance lessons near Folly Beach, SC, Holy City Dance Center offers something for everyone, whether you're looking to join a new performance team or a simple Mommy & Me program. Whether you are two or 102 years old, we want you in class having fun!!

Our class lessons include the following:

  • Ballet
  • Tap
  • Jazz
  • Hip Hop
  • Contemporary
  • Acro-Dance
  • Jumps & Turns
  • Stretch & Strengthen
  • Clogging
  • Musical Theater
  • Adult Dance Classes
  • Award Winning Competition Team
  • Performance Team
  • Recital Performance
  • Much More!

A Glance at Our Facility

Wondering whether or not our dance center is the right fit for you and your family? Located at 1939 Clements Ferry Road in Folly Beach, SC, we take a lot of pride in our facility and like to think that shows as soon as you walk through our front doors. With 4000 sq. ft. of space, we're able to provide the best everything you or your loved one needs for a high-quality dance education.

Our dance features many amenities that dancers love, including the following:

Dance Room

Three Large Dance Rooms

Each of our dance rooms is fully equipped with unique sub-flooring to help sustain joint health and to ensure our students can train in a safe environment.

Specialty Flooring

Specialty Flooring for Dancers

We incorporate Vinyl Marley flooring in studios one and two to help reduce injury and promote better training. In studio three, we have applied special acoustic flooring made specifically for tap dancers. By providing enhanced flooring for our students, we can better ensure they enjoy a professional, purposeful dancing experience.

Large Lobby

Large Lobby

Need to wait while your little one or spouse finishes dancing classes? Our lobby is spacious and has free high-speed WiFi, so you can surf the web or get work done while you wait.

Student Lounge

Student Lounge

When our students aren't in class, they have their own lounge with lockers where they can change and enjoy each other's company.

Livestreams

Livestreams

Pull up a chair in our lobby and get a peek into our process! Whether you're a student, parent, or spouse, our livestreams are fun and educational to watch.

 Dance Classes Folly Beach, SC

Holy City Dance Lessons Near Folly Beach, SC

At Holy City Dance Center, we're proud to offer dancing classes for all ages, from recreational programming for very young students to programs for teens and adults. Thinking we might not have a class for you if you're a beginner? Think again! No matter your experience level, we've got a dance program to help you grow.

A few of our most popular dance programs include the following:

Youth Programs

Our recreational youth programs are a great way for kids to learn about dance while practicing balance, motor skills, discipline, and much more.

 Dance Studio Folly Beach, SC

Mommy & Me: Ages 2-3

For toddlers who love to dance and move around, we offer a 45-minute Creative Movement class that focuses on basic ballet movements. This class is designed for boys and girls between the ages of 2 and 3 years old and aims to help fine-tune gross motor skills while building a passion for dance at an early age. To ensure that our young dancers stay engaged throughout the year, we integrate music, props, and seasonal themes into our lessons. Moms are welcome to join in on the fun or simply watch their little ones shine.

 Dance Courses Folly Beach, SC

Pre-K Combo Ages 3-4 (Ballet & Tap and Ballet & Jazz)

If your little one is between the ages of three and four and interested in dance, these hour-long classes are a great way for them to learn about different styles. Props, music, and games are still incorporated, but with added technical elements that will expand their dance knowledge and prepare them for a successful dance career. During each class session, students will focus on both style offerings and should ensure they have the necessary shoes and attire for each.

 Youth Dance School Folly Beach, SC

Youth Combo 5-7 (Ballet & Tap and Ballet & Jazz)

This package mimics our Pre-K Combo with all of the same features but is tailored to older children between the ages of five and seven.

 Adult Dance School Folly Beach, SC

Kinderpop Ages 5-7

For children aged five to seven, this 45-minute class offers a fun and lively introduction to hip-hop dance. While training, students will learn the fundamentals and vocabulary of hip-hop in an upbeat environment.

 Child Dance School Folly Beach, SC

Recreational Programs

These dance classes near Folly Beach, SC, are best suited for beginner and intermediate students between the ages of eight and eighteen.

 Youth Dance Classes Folly Beach, SC

For those who wish to delve into the intricacies of tap technique, these classes run for 45 minutes and cover all the fundamental tap moves. As students progress to higher-level classes, they will build on their skills and expand their repertoire. The classes include warm-up exercises, center-floor work, across-the-floor combinations, and complex choreography.

For students dedicated to improving their jazz technique's precision and intensity, these classes are the perfect fit. The classes run for a duration of 45 minutes and cover a range of activities, including a rigorous warm-up with a focus on flexibility training, center-floor work, across-the-floor combinations, and sharp choreography.

Our ballet classes are structured to help students master classical Vaganova techniques through barre exercises, center floor work, across-the-floor combinations, flexibility training, and explanations of ballet terminology. Each class is 1.5 hours long.

These 45-minute classes are designed for students who love to have fun and be the center of attention. They are perfect for lively, cheerful, and enthusiastic learners who want a welcoming and secure environment to express their energy. The classes concentrate on teaching the basics of footwork, body rolls, dynamics, and other essential dance skills.

If you're a student looking to express yourself through contemporary dance, these 45-minute classes are perfect for you. They focus on exploring the connection between emotion and movement, incorporating elements of lyrical dance, floor work, partnering, and improvisation. Through these methods, you'll be able to experience a sense of free movement and develop your own unique contemporary dance style.

These classes focus on building strength and flexibility for dancers while prioritizing injury prevention. Consisting of 45 to 60-minute sessions, taking this class one to two times a week can improve dancers' movement quality, style-specific skills, endurance, and prolong their dance careers.

Other recreational dance programs at Holy City Dance Center include:

  • Musical Theater - Focusing on techniques and dancing styles used in Broadway shows.
  • Dance FUNctions - Learn how to be a well-rounded, successful dancer.
  • Dance Comp & Improv - Learn the foundational skills of dance improv and the building blocks of dance composition.
  • Acro Dance - Learn how to blend the art of acrobatics and floor tumbling with traditional dancing.
  • Inclusive Dance - This class is perfect for dancers who have developmental delays or disabilities.

Adult Programs

If you're looking for a dance studio near Folly Beach, SC, that offers dance lessons for working adults, look no further than Holy City Dance Center. Our adult dance classes cater to all ages and abilities, from beginners to advanced. We aim to create a free and open environment where adult dancers can express themselves.

It's time to get those jazz hands moving! This 45-minute beginner-intermediate jazz class includes warm-up, strength training, center floor work, across-the-floor combinations, and sharp choreography.

This one-hour ballet class focuses on the power and accuracy of ballet technique. The class includes a well-planned barre warm-up, exercises for stretching and strengthening, center floor work, combinations across the floor, and ballet choreography.

This class is designed for those who are new to line dancing or need to refresh their skills. We will review choreographed steps and dances at a slower pace, covering the basics of line dancing and common dance terms. Each week, we will also learn at least one new dance.

Additional adult dance programs offered by Holy City Dance Center include:

Hip-Hop - This fun class features a structured walkthrough of the high-energy dance techniques known in hip-hop dancing.

Contemporary - Learn how to show emotion through dancing while adopting a free sense of stylization and movement.

Tap - If you're a beginner or intermediate dancer craving a journey that explores the precision and complexity of tap dancing, this class is for you.

 Adult Dance Classes Folly Beach, SC

Top Dancing Tips for Beginners in South Carolina

At Holy City Dance Center, we welcome students of all ages and experience levels. In fact, many of our students come to us with little-to-no dancing experience. We work closely with these students to help develop their dancing fundamentals and gradually incorporate new techniques and styles. If you know that you want to begin dancing but feel like the learning curve is too high, don't worry. We can help build your skill and confidence step-by-step with beginner dance lessons near Folly Beach, SC.

To help you along the way and expedite the learning process, keep these easy-to-implement tips in mind.

Find Your Inspiration

Find Your Inspiration

Whether you're a beginner or a seasoned pro, the secret to becoming a great dancer is having the desire to excel. Always remember the reasons why you love dancing, as it will motivate you in moments of discouragement or lethargy. Ignite your passion by watching dance performances, chatting with fellow dancers, attending dance events, or simply listening to music that gets you moving.

Always Warm Up

Always Warm Up

Dancing without taking the time to warm up is sort of like baking biscuits without preheating your oven. You might be anxious to jump in and start, but doing so can leave you deflated and unprepared. Dancing with a cold and stiff body can be unpleasant and may lead to muscle injuries. Therefore, it's advisable to warm up and stretch before dancing. Doing so will help you move with greater range and control and also reduce the risk of injuries.

Let Go and Have Fun

Let Go and Have Fun

Always keep in mind that dancing is supposed to be a fun activity, not a burden or a source of anxiety. Dancing should be an outlet for those negative emotions! When you come for lessons at Holy City Dance Center, you can look forward to a fun, inviting atmosphere. No matter how many (or how few) dance moves you know, you can always have a good time learning how to dance with the right instructors and partners. Relax, have fun, and go with the flow. You'll be happy you did.

Get Your Groove On

Get Your Groove On

To improve your dancing skills, it's best to narrow down the specific styles you want to learn and focus on their foundational movements. One thing that all dance styles have in common is the "groove." You may not know it, but you probably groove out naturally to music all the time. Do you bob your head while driving or sway side to side at the club? If so, you've got the groove. Practicing grooves and becoming more comfortable with your body's movements will help you look better while dancing, whether in class, at a performance, or anywhere else.

Mix It Up

Mix It Up

When you first start dancing, it's common to want to dance with the same partner or friend. However, this can become boring over time. To avoid this, try dancing with a variety of people, especially when you're still learning the dance. Each person's interpretation of the music will give you a new perspective on the dance. You may worry about dancing with someone who is more advanced or less skilled than you. However, dancing with different people can help you practice being a good leader or follower. Every dance can be an opportunity to learn and grow. That's why, at Holy City Dance Center, we encourage multiple dance partners in applicable programs.

Learn and Repeat the Basics

Learn and Repeat the Basics

They say that repetition is key when it comes to learning a skill, and that's especially true when dancing. Practicing techniques over and over helps them become ingrained in your muscle memory, allowing you to execute them effortlessly. For instance, Popping exercises can enhance your control and control. House Step routines can improve your footwork and make you more comfortable on the dance floor. Whatever the dance style, start by nailing down and repeating elementary techniques. Before you know it, you'll be executing full routines from muscle memory.

Request Class Information

Dance with Your Heart and Your Feet Will Follow at Holy City Dance Center

 Child Dance Classes Folly Beach, SC

Whether you're looking for an extracurricular outlet for your child or want to learn how to tap dance in your 40s, our dance studio near Folly Beach, SC, is the premier choice for quality dance lessons. Our instructors are passionate about bringing your dancing dreams to life and are committed to providing you with an experience like no other. If you're ready to dance with your heart, your feet are sure to follow. All it takes is a little guidance and inspiration. Contact our dance studio today and take the first step toward a true dancing education tomorrow.

Latest News in Folly Beach, SC

Commentary: Many of us remember a different Folly Beach

On New Year’s Eve weekend, I visited Mr. John’s Beach Store on Center Street on Folly Beach. I have been visiting Mr. John’s Beach Store since I was a child staying at my grandparents’ home on East Arctic Avenue in the summer. Yet this visit was different. It was a farewell visit.Mr. John’s Beach Store has been a fixture on Folly Beach since 1951. The affectionately coined “mayor of Folly Beach,” Paul Chrysostom, took over the family business started by his parents, John and Rachel Chrysostom....

On New Year’s Eve weekend, I visited Mr. John’s Beach Store on Center Street on Folly Beach. I have been visiting Mr. John’s Beach Store since I was a child staying at my grandparents’ home on East Arctic Avenue in the summer. Yet this visit was different. It was a farewell visit.

Mr. John’s Beach Store has been a fixture on Folly Beach since 1951. The affectionately coined “mayor of Folly Beach,” Paul Chrysostom, took over the family business started by his parents, John and Rachel Chrysostom. They were esteemed, respected and beloved members of the community; John was a bookkeeper, accountant and Greek professor, and his wife, Rachel, a pharmacist.

For many of us who recall the old days on Folly, Mr. John’s was the last stronghold of memories that can never be replaced. Mr. John’s, which recently was sold, was the heart and soul of Center Street.

I recently read an article on the WCSC-TV website that quoted Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin as saying: “When people come to me and say, ‘I want Folly Beach to be like it was,’ I look at them and say, ‘What do you remember Folly Beach being?’”

Given that Mayor Goodwin moved to Folly Beach in 1998, I would like to respectfully answer his question.

Folly Beach was a vibrant, magical, exciting, warm and lovable place. It was naturally community oriented. The sleepy beach. Some even called it the poor man’s beach.

But rest assured, there was nothing poor or wanting about Folly.

It was overflowing with riches, treasures that could never be measured materially. I don’t even remember the word tourist; everyone was welcomed and seen the same.

When I was growing up in the 1960s and ’70s, visiting Folly was like entering a portal into an enchanted world.

A horse that belonged to a neighbor was stabled in our backyard.

My grandfather gave the Bruggemann family next door our backyard garage to stable their horse, Nosy.

The family’s daughter, Nancy, in turn, gave me rides on Nosy on the beach. It was a young girl’s dream.

The boy next door was my first crush. It was a time of innocence and sweetness that can never be duplicated.

Cars could drive on the beach, horses pranced along the streets, and neighbors never locked their doors for the simple reason that our neighbors were not considered neighbors. They were family.

Folly wasn’t “funky.” It wasn’t branded. It wasn’t marketed. It was what it was.

The Sanitary Restaurant on Center Street had a lunch counter that sold soft-serve ice cream sundaes and the best sandwiches and comfort food.

The Pavilion had wooden benches, hotdogs and hamburgers, and the amusement rides twirled with the echo of children’s laughter in the air.

We used to walk an eternity over the big sand dunes to get to the beach.

Many times, we would swim in the gullies by the old groins even if folks were there crabbing.

My grandfather George Manos would go out in the wee hours of the morning with his big net and bring in buckets of fish for my grandmother Virginia to clean and cook.

The front porch was an open door that called to passersby: “Come on up. The table is full.”

Generosity and hospitality flowed like the ocean. And at night, we would be lulled to sleep by the sound of her waves.

Goodbye, Mr. John’s Beach Store.

You will always be in my heart. This is what Folly was like — in all her beauty, simplicity and wonder. A reminder that the greatest gifts of life are priceless.

Jackie Morfesis is a Charleston writer, speaker and community advocate.

Folly Beach councilman to resign ‘in the name of love’

FOLLY BEACH — A Folly Beach city councilman with just under two years left in his term his calling it quits. His reasoning?That four-letter word called love.Councilman Eddie Ellis will leave behind his seat on the barrier island’s governing body on March 30, the City of Folly Beach announced Jan. 2 on Facebook.Ellis told The Post and Courier in a written statement the sudden resignation is because of love — he plans to move to Missouri to be with his long-distance girlfriend.He plans to deliver a...

FOLLY BEACH — A Folly Beach city councilman with just under two years left in his term his calling it quits. His reasoning?

That four-letter word called love.

Councilman Eddie Ellis will leave behind his seat on the barrier island’s governing body on March 30, the City of Folly Beach announced Jan. 2 on Facebook.

Ellis told The Post and Courier in a written statement the sudden resignation is because of love — he plans to move to Missouri to be with his long-distance girlfriend.

He plans to deliver a formal statement at the Feb. 13 council meeting, a date significant for its proximity to Valentine’s Day.

“I thought Feb. 13, the day before Valentine’s Day, would be a great time to tell the public my reason for resigning, but my announcement has created quite the stirring of the pot. So I will comment in short — I am resigning in the name of love,” Ellis said.

The pair met on the Fourth of July 2018, Ellis said. His girlfriend, an insurance broker named Diane Finnestead based in St. Louis, spent 14 months on the island throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Ellis has served on the Cty Council for a combined 16 years. He ran for reelection in 2020 but did not win.

In 2022, he chose to run again, a move he said Finnestead supported, as Ellis was not ready to leave the community he’s served for years, nor the landscaping business he’s owned and operated on Folly Beach for the past 28 years.

Ellis secured another term in the 2022 election, though following the 2023 election cycle he made up his mind to resign. He cited witnessing a division in the community erupt over limiting short-term rental licenses on the island as a catalyst.

“As the campaigns proceeded in our past election, I witnessed a continuation of political ugliness in a community divided over the short-term rental issue. It wasn’t the same in my election of 2022,” Ellis said.

Folly Beach Municipal Clerk Wes Graham said Ellis notified the city he was considering resigning but did not provide a formal notice or timeline until Jan. 2 when he officially submitted his letter of resignation.

Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin said the resignation came with little explanation.

“I didn’t expect him to resign,” Goodwin said. “He’s worked hard for the citizens of Folly Beach and he’s always done what he thought was the best for the citizens of Folly Beach, so you know, I hate to see him go.”

Ellis will stay on council until March 30. According to the Charleston County Board of Voter Registration and Elections, a signed letter of resignation from Ellis is needed before information on a special election will be released.

“We will be updating the community with more information as soon as it is available. We do know that Charleston County will run the election and can answer all election-related questions,” Graham said.

Several municipalities in the Lowcountry, including Folly Beach, underwent an election cycle in November. Folly Beach elected one new face to the council in the November 2023 election, Chris Bizzell.

Folly Beach’s roughly 2,100-person population is expected to head back to the polls in April to elect another council member to fill Ellis’s seat for the rest of the term, which expires in November 2025.

Goodwin said he’s not looking forward to the city going through another election season.

“We just went through the election. I hate to go through another one,” Goodwin said. “It creates so much tension, like every election does everywhere,” Goodwin said.

NORTH CHARLESTON — To continue efforts to become the Coast Guard’s “operational center of gravity” on the East Coast, officials broke ground Jan. 26 on its new $160 million campus.

This 64-acre site along the Cooper River — just south of the former naval base that closed in 1996 — will house an administration building and redesigned 1,100-foot concrete pier.

Construction is expected to begin later this year and be completed in 2026.

“This Charleston campus will have improved infrastructure that translates into more productive personnel and more efficient operations,” said Capt. Neal Armstrong, the commanding officer of facilities design and construction.

The 51,500-square-foot administration building will provide training and conference room space, and additional rooms dedicated to cutter ship support.

Sustainability is a priority, so the new facility will achieve net-zero energy usage and a net-zero carbon footprint, Armstrong said.

The current Pier November will be replaced with a pier more than three feet taller to enhance durability during coastal storms. It will provide utilities to support five national security cutters and a 90-ton crane, which is critical for dockside maintenance, Armstrong said.

During the design and construction phases nearly 60 subcontractors will support the two main contractors on the project, Whiting-Turner Contracting Company and RQ Construction LLC, providing work for nearly 900 people.

Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Linda Fagan, who spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony, said every Coast Guard mission begins and ends at a shore facility. When the ships are not at sea, they need a base that can provide necessary maintenance, she added.

The missions conducted at Base Charleston are vital to protecting national security and economic prosperity, Fagan said, adding that the new campus will aid in “lifesaving work,” including patrolling the waters for smuggled narcotics.

‘Jolly Folly Christmas’: Man’s extensive collection captures holidays at Folly Beach

FOLLY BEACH — Driving down a darkened Ashley Avenue, there is a sudden, bright and funky oasis near 6th Street East that pops out. Welcome to Christmas at Folly Beach, courtesy of resident Kevin Hodges.His eclectic yard art and lights, with a tall grass hut near the front door of his rambling shack, and signs everywhere declaring the High Life, are well known around town.“It’s really amazing how many people know this house,” Hodges said, standing under the illuminated tree. “If I walk into a place,...

FOLLY BEACH — Driving down a darkened Ashley Avenue, there is a sudden, bright and funky oasis near 6th Street East that pops out. Welcome to Christmas at Folly Beach, courtesy of resident Kevin Hodges.

His eclectic yard art and lights, with a tall grass hut near the front door of his rambling shack, and signs everywhere declaring the High Life, are well known around town.

“It’s really amazing how many people know this house,” Hodges said, standing under the illuminated tree. “If I walk into a place, they won’t know who I am. If I say, ‘I live in the High Life house,’ they know exactly who I am. The house is famous.”

It caught the eye of producers for the “Outer Banks” television series that has been filmed in Charleston the last few years. The house and yard served as the backdrop for part of an episode in the third season.

“They fell in love with the house,” Hodges said. “The whole crew piled in here.”

He thinks it was portrayed as an artist’s house at the beach, and in a way it is.

“I do pest control for a living,” Hodges said, but his passion is woodworking.

“Everything in here, I’ve made,” he said, gesturing around the shack. “Except for the couch.”

A lot of it is surfboard-themed or surfboard-shaped, like a cabinet in the living room. Outside, a wooden surfer peeks out from behind a tree wearing a Santa hat and clutching a bright yellow surfboard. Another blue surfer sits out front on a blue board, but a visitor doesn’t recognize him.

“That’s Jack Frost,” Hodges said, and he is, apparently, hanging ten.

It all started with the big palm tree out front about 15 years ago, and Hodges said that is still the first thing people notice, with its rings of lights and oversized ornaments. One is a plaque that reads, “Have a Jolly Folly Christmas,” while others are glittery balls.

“You really don’t see too many people hang ornaments from them,” Hodges said. In fact, all of his Christmas trees are in the yard.

“We tried to put a Christmas tree in here,” he said, gesturing around the shack, “but it’s too small.”

He isn’t the only artist on display — an ex-girlfriend painted a striking mural of Santa in his sleigh with the reindeer flying high over a stand of palm trees.

It takes about three days to get it set up, and Hodges thinks there are probably 200 strings of lights spread throughout the yard. Every year, he adds something to it.

Hodges walks out of the front door holding a surprisingly heavy shark carved out of teak that he has been working on and adds it atop a bench. Things get destroyed by the elements, so they need to be replaced. The grass hut used to be held up only by large bamboo poles before a buddy ran his truck into it, so now all of the poles are reinforced with two-by-fours inside. The hut’s roof gets refreshed with new palm fronds Hodges just throws up there, and somehow they stay, even in high winds.

Charleston Scene

In the house, in the yard, are things he created.

“I definitely like making stuff a lot more than buying it,” Hodges said.

And it all has a theme.

“It’s Folly Christmas,” Hodges said. “Just a laid-back Christmas. It’s old-style Folly.”

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last minute tickets and little-known experiences hand-selected by our newsroom in your inbox each Thursday.

South Carolina has a variety of terrains.

The Blue Ridge Mountains stretch through the Upstate, and the beaches of the Lowcountry keep the city airport and its record-setting traffic level busy. The rolling hills of the Midlands and Pee Dee make way for the farms amid ever-growing industrial expansion.

Each area has character, and with it, its own brand of flora.

Clemson’s Natural Heritage Garden has a microcosm of the state’s plant life that can be visited throughout the year. You can always start a garden, though, made up of some gems from across the unique regions of the state if you’d rather enjoy them in your own backyard.

Think about adding some of these flowers to an already existing garden, or try to create a garden entirely made up of state staples as a fun project.

The Lowcountry: Black-Eyed Susans

These perennials are good for beginners, since rather than die off during the winter, they close up and retain the natural leaves that grow on their stems.

“You might know the terms, you might know this is gonna come back or that’s gonna die,” shared Dave Manger, owner of Roots and Shoots Nursery in West Ashley. “But when you’re visually looking at your garden and you’re new to it, you want visual proof that your plant is still alive.”

The Susans, characterized by their bright yellow and sometimes golden petals and black seed center, grow best in moist, well-drained soil and full sun but can take a bit of shade. They’ll usually bloom beginning during the upcoming early summer months.

The flowers can be seen all over the Charleston area in people’s yards and public parks, Manger said. The plants are the most popular ones he sells, with a couple of hundred varieties for sale at Roots and Shoots.

They’re perfect for beginners, Manger said, since you can put them anywhere and they’ll be happy.

The Pee Dee: Camellias

Camellias can be seen throughout Kalmia Gardens in Hartsville, which itself is seeing a battle between invasive and native plant species playing within it.

The camellias are one of the plants of Miss May’s Folly, the term given to one woman’s dream to turn a once-neglected piece of land into what can be seen today. These flowers like well-drained soil with consistent protection from the afternoon sun.

A quick heads-up, though: Start planting these now, especially if you’re in the Pee Dee area. Lisa King, who runs garden consulting business Leaf and Garden, said planting during the winter means less watering and deeper development of the plant’s roots into the ground.

Camellias can bloom in early spring, late fall and winter, depending on the type, and they bloom in colors ranging from white to pink to red. The Japanese camellias, which usually bloom in colder weather, prefer some light shade when being planted.

The first camellias were brought to South Carolina by Frenchman André Michaux, who was the botanist to King Louis XVI, in 1786. He shared his camellias with Henry Middleton, who started a garden at Middleton Place in 1741. Visitors can see one of the original plants today — a double red camellia known as Reine des Fleurs, or the Queen of Flowers, which reigns over the more than 4,000 camellias on the estate.

Business

Upstate: Smooth Penstemon

Christina Bruner owns Carolina Wild Native Wildflower Nursery in Anderson, just over an hour away from the mountains. She calls the perennial Smooth Penstemon, with its elongated white bulbs that dangle from the stem, a “workhorse plant.”

“You can put it in almost any setting in the area and it’s going to do well for you as long as you’ve got enough sun,” Bruner said.

The native plant usually blooms in late spring or early summer and can be found on the way to the mountains and prefers full sun to light shade. Bruner warned against babying the plant and watering it too much and echoed King’s sentiment of fewer, but longer, watering sessions that promote deeper root growth.

“The biggest thing is to give them good drainage,” Bruner said.

Midlands: Raulston Hardy

This bush-like plant and its flowers are perfect for going alongside a home’s foundation, said Lori Watson, who owns Mill Creek Greenhouses in Columbia.

Getting the plant from Mill Creek may be a challenge, though. Watson said these native plants have been flying off the shelf for the past 2½ years.

“People are buying them all the time,” Watson said.

Watson said she has a few of the drought-tolerant plants in front of her house and rarely touches them. White flowers will bloom in April but will also flower until fall and sometimes into the spring. It can retain its leaves through a mild winter, though.

The plant can tolerate a range of temperatures and soil conditions, but remember to plant it in full sun or partial shade.

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last minute tickets and little-known experiences hand-selected by our newsroom in your inbox each Thursday.

Where to Eat Well at Charleston’s Beaches

Many of those visiting Charleston know that downtown is a hot spot for restaurants, but where should folks visiting one of the local beaches eat? From barbecue to noodle bowls, these island eateries can offer a wealth of choices for the hungry wave jumper or sunbather. Read MoreEater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. ...

Many of those visiting Charleston know that downtown is a hot spot for restaurants, but where should folks visiting one of the local beaches eat? From barbecue to noodle bowls, these island eateries can offer a wealth of choices for the hungry wave jumper or sunbather.

Read More

Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process. If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Before a day at Folly Beach, frequent visitors know to hit up Lost Dog for brunch. The cafe has something for everyone on the menu, from huevos rancheros to fresh fruit parfaits. Relax with a mimosa before hitting the waves and sand.

Full of surfers and deal-seekers, Folly Beach stop Jack of Cups offers filling curry nachos, dahl, and curry meatballs. The menu is a mash-up of different cuisines from across the globe, including nods to the South, which is always good while sipping a few craft beers.

Self-proclaimed “chill ass bar,” Lowlife offers expertly crafted cocktails, queso, local shrimp rolls, double cheeseburgers, and more in a hip and lively beach space. Lowlife also serves brunch every day of the week, so it’s like a vacation within a vacation.

A visit to Taco Boy is all about the experience. The interiors are lively and full of fun details. It offers a long list of tacos with unexpected fillings, like the Korean beef tacos stuffed with kimchi and grilled flank steak or the sauteed shrimp tacos come with ancho chile yogurt sauce and cabbage. On a nice day, enjoy the patio with a few friends and a frozen screwdriver to go with the other selections.

Spanish for "the ugly boy," Chico Feo makes for a super chill stop after a day on the beach. The eatery feels like visiting a friend’s backyard. The menu is a mix-up of warm weather favorites from across the globe, like Cuban beans and rice, bun cha, and plenty of tacos.

Bert’s Market isn’t a restaurant, but it is an icon on Folly Beach. The 24-hour corner store is well known as stop for made-to-order sandwiches and just about everything else you need for a day at the beach. Bert’s puts it best: “Patronized by freaks, surfers, skaters, crunks, retirees, tourists, stoners, day trippers, hippies, hipsters, and regular folk, Bert’s is the rockingest grocery in town.”

Dining at Sullivan’s Fish Camp is like stepping onto a sailboat out of the 1970s. The retro-chic restaurant is one of the chicest on the island. The menu includes fish camp classics, like peel-and-eat shrimp and smoked fish dip, paired with more modern offerings, like a tuna smash burger or Nashville hot grouper cheeks.

Diners can eat pizza, pasta, and fresh seafood just a few steps from the ocean. From the skilled hands of executive chef Jacques Larson, the Obstinate Daughter offers a stunning dining room to spend visit for lunch, brunch, or dinner. Visitors should order a craft cocktail, a few oysters, and try the ricotta gnocchi with short rib ragu at least once.

Home Team BBQ on Sullivan's Island is always packed with friends and families ordering pulled pork plates and catching a game on the televisions. The smoked wings with Alabama white sauce are addictive, as are the frozen boozy Gamechanger cocktails.

Cozy bistro High Thyme offers a more upscale experience than most beach-goers expect. Guests visit this Middle Street restaurant for celebratory dinners and Sunday morning brunches. Find dishes like mussels in a coconut chili broth, cioppino, three-meat bolognese lasagna, lamb meatballs, and more comforting dishes.

Contemporary Italian eatery Coda del Pesce sits right on the beach at Isle of Palms. Customers can watch the ocean while ordering from chef Ken Vedrinski’s seafood-filled menu. Make reservations early for dishes like the snowy grouper with peanut potatoes, grapes, and Castelvetrano olives.

Before a day at Folly Beach, frequent visitors know to hit up Lost Dog for brunch. The cafe has something for everyone on the menu, from huevos rancheros to fresh fruit parfaits. Relax with a mimosa before hitting the waves and sand.

Full of surfers and deal-seekers, Folly Beach stop Jack of Cups offers filling curry nachos, dahl, and curry meatballs. The menu is a mash-up of different cuisines from across the globe, including nods to the South, which is always good while sipping a few craft beers.

Self-proclaimed “chill ass bar,” Lowlife offers expertly crafted cocktails, queso, local shrimp rolls, double cheeseburgers, and more in a hip and lively beach space. Lowlife also serves brunch every day of the week, so it’s like a vacation within a vacation.

A visit to Taco Boy is all about the experience. The interiors are lively and full of fun details. It offers a long list of tacos with unexpected fillings, like the Korean beef tacos stuffed with kimchi and grilled flank steak or the sauteed shrimp tacos come with ancho chile yogurt sauce and cabbage. On a nice day, enjoy the patio with a few friends and a frozen screwdriver to go with the other selections.

Spanish for "the ugly boy," Chico Feo makes for a super chill stop after a day on the beach. The eatery feels like visiting a friend’s backyard. The menu is a mix-up of warm weather favorites from across the globe, like Cuban beans and rice, bun cha, and plenty of tacos.

Bert’s Market isn’t a restaurant, but it is an icon on Folly Beach. The 24-hour corner store is well known as stop for made-to-order sandwiches and just about everything else you need for a day at the beach. Bert’s puts it best: “Patronized by freaks, surfers, skaters, crunks, retirees, tourists, stoners, day trippers, hippies, hipsters, and regular folk, Bert’s is the rockingest grocery in town.”

Dining at Sullivan’s Fish Camp is like stepping onto a sailboat out of the 1970s. The retro-chic restaurant is one of the chicest on the island. The menu includes fish camp classics, like peel-and-eat shrimp and smoked fish dip, paired with more modern offerings, like a tuna smash burger or Nashville hot grouper cheeks.

Diners can eat pizza, pasta, and fresh seafood just a few steps from the ocean. From the skilled hands of executive chef Jacques Larson, the Obstinate Daughter offers a stunning dining room to spend visit for lunch, brunch, or dinner. Visitors should order a craft cocktail, a few oysters, and try the ricotta gnocchi with short rib ragu at least once.

Home Team BBQ on Sullivan's Island is always packed with friends and families ordering pulled pork plates and catching a game on the televisions. The smoked wings with Alabama white sauce are addictive, as are the frozen boozy Gamechanger cocktails.

Cozy bistro High Thyme offers a more upscale experience than most beach-goers expect. Guests visit this Middle Street restaurant for celebratory dinners and Sunday morning brunches. Find dishes like mussels in a coconut chili broth, cioppino, three-meat bolognese lasagna, lamb meatballs, and more comforting dishes.

Contemporary Italian eatery Coda del Pesce sits right on the beach at Isle of Palms. Customers can watch the ocean while ordering from chef Ken Vedrinski’s seafood-filled menu. Make reservations early for dishes like the snowy grouper with peanut potatoes, grapes, and Castelvetrano olives.

Folly Beach tries to make short-term rental cap work as renewal period approaches

A citizen’s petition successfully limited the number of short-term rentals on Folly Beach. Now, City Council has three months to make the ordinance function smoothly before the renewal period for rental licenses opens in March.Short-term renting is a lucrative business, especially for a barrier island like Folly Beach. Vacation rentals on the “Edge of America” generated millions of dollars in gross revenue in 2022, though some people felt the number of rentals on the island had gotten out of hand.Save Folly&rs...

A citizen’s petition successfully limited the number of short-term rentals on Folly Beach. Now, City Council has three months to make the ordinance function smoothly before the renewal period for rental licenses opens in March.

Short-term renting is a lucrative business, especially for a barrier island like Folly Beach. Vacation rentals on the “Edge of America” generated millions of dollars in gross revenue in 2022, though some people felt the number of rentals on the island had gotten out of hand.

Save Folly’s Future, a group spearheaded by Folly Beach property owner and West Ashley resident John McFarland, took it upon themselves to do something about it.

“Save Folly’s Future considers the alarming increase in investment STRs on Folly an existential threat to the community. Whatever your opinion, positive or negative, it’s a community-wide issue and should be decided by a community-wide vote,” McFarland wrote in an August 2022 Save Folly’s Future newsletter.

The organization penned a petition that garnered over 400 signatures, more than 15 percent of the city’s registered voters — the minimum amount required by South Carolina state law to send the issue to Folly Beach voters, triggering a referendum that would adopt the ordinance as written, if passed.

The bare-bones ordinance was adopted last February by a slim margin of less than 80 votes. It restricted the number of investment short-term rental licenses, for rentals that are not owner-occupied, to 800. And it makes licenses nontransferable with few exceptions.

“We’ve been managing the ordinance since February. It was drafted, you know, by a layperson. It didn’t anticipate a lot of things that have come up since then,” Folly Beach City Administrator Aaron Pope said.

According to the latest data the city council received in November, there are 955 investment STR licenses in good standing on the island. Licenses issued before the cap was instituted are able to renew, but with the number of active licenses exceeding the 800-license cap, the wait list is shaping up to be a long one.

NORTH CHARLESTON — To continue efforts to become the Coast Guard’s “operational center of gravity” on the East Coast, officials broke ground Jan. 26 on its new $160 million campus.

This 64-acre site along the Cooper River — just south of the former naval base that closed in 1996 — will house an administration building and redesigned 1,100-foot concrete pier.

Construction is expected to begin later this year and be completed in 2026.

“This Charleston campus will have improved infrastructure that translates into more productive personnel and more efficient operations,” said Capt. Neal Armstrong, the commanding officer of facilities design and construction.

The 51,500-square-foot administration building will provide training and conference room space, and additional rooms dedicated to cutter ship support.

Sustainability is a priority, so the new facility will achieve net-zero energy usage and a net-zero carbon footprint, Armstrong said.

The current Pier November will be replaced with a pier more than three feet taller to enhance durability during coastal storms. It will provide utilities to support five national security cutters and a 90-ton crane, which is critical for dockside maintenance, Armstrong said.

During the design and construction phases nearly 60 subcontractors will support the two main contractors on the project, Whiting-Turner Contracting Company and RQ Construction LLC, providing work for nearly 900 people.

Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Linda Fagan, who spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony, said every Coast Guard mission begins and ends at a shore facility. When the ships are not at sea, they need a base that can provide necessary maintenance, she added.

The missions conducted at Base Charleston are vital to protecting national security and economic prosperity, Fagan said, adding that the new campus will aid in “lifesaving work,” including patrolling the waters for smuggled narcotics.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.